WCAF 2019 Program

Delta Hotels Grand Okanagan Resort, Kelowna BC

Thursday, May 2, 2019

Stop by the WCAF registration desk to register or check in for the event!

// Location: Lower Foyer //
Join us for light snacks and refreshments and a great opportunity to mingle with WCAF 2019 attendees as we welcome you to this year's event!

// Location: Cascade/Cassiar Room //

Friday, May 3, 2019

Stop by the WCAF registration desk to register or check in for the event!

// Location: Okanagan Foyer //
// Location: Okanagan Foyer //
Open to all

// Location: Summit Room //
Opening remarks
- Dr. Mandy Manak, Chair, WCAF Committee
- Roxane Lidley, Chief, Westbank First Nation
- Loyal Wooldridge, Councillor, City of Kelowna - Jane Thornthwaite, MLA North Vancouver – Seymour


// Location: Okanagan Room //
EventMobi (Event App) Introduction - Kate Fish

// Location: Okanagan Room //

Learning Objectives
• Key Recovery Supports
• Leading Factors in Maintaining recovery
• Leading Barriers to Recovery
• Leading Recovery Resources and Programs
• Leading teams and concepts in recovery

// Location: Okanagan Room //
Cannabis is the most abused illicit drug in the world with an estimated 2.5% of the world’s population (180 million) using it regularly (World Drug Report 2017). Nationally, about 4.2 million or 14% of Canadians aged 15 years and older reported some use of cannabis products for medical or non-medical use in the past three months. More than half (56%) of the users indicated that they used some form of cannabis "daily" or "weekly." More than 25% report some use in the past 3 months (National Cannabis Survey). According to the 2015 US National Survey on Drug Use and Health, an estimated 22 million people used cannabis in the past month. About 30% of those who use cannabis may have some degree of cannabis use disorder. People who begin using cannabis before the age of 18 are 4-7 times more likely to develop a cannabis use disorder than adults. Cannabis use is associated with social and health consequences (WHO, 2016) including poor educational, professional and social achievements, cognitive impairment, loss of motor coordination, motor-vehicle accidents, and a wide range of health consequences involving almost all physiological systems thereby placing an individual at high risk for increased morbidity and mortality. Several pharmacological agents have been tested to treat cannabis use disorder with interesting results. This presentation will discuss the current clinical research on medical and health consequences of cannabis use, various treatment modalities that have been tested for treating cannabis use disorder and finally, discuss the medical properties of cannabis and its various products. Finally, if time permits, the presentation will discuss the current ongoing research on cannabis at US National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH.

Learning Objectives
• The incidence and prevalence of cannabis use in Canada, US and the world
• The currently available clinical research on adverse medical/health consequences of cannabis use
• The clinical evidence for cannabis, cannabidiol and other cannabinoids as medicine

// Location: Okanagan Room //
// Location: Shuswap/Pennask/Skeena Room //

Learning Objectives
• Understanding stimulant use disorders (Cocaine and Crystal Meth)
• Understand psychosis and substance use
• Evidence base treatment approach to crystal meth induced psychosis

// Location: Okanagan Room //

Many of the mat yoga poses have been adapted for the chair, offering gentle stretching to ease muscle tension due to long sitting at meetings, conferences or sitting in front of a computer. This session includes introduction to breath work, stretching, gentle spinal twists, hip openers, shoulder rolls, lower back release.

// Location: Okanagan Room //
On October 17, 2018 Canada became the first G-7 country to legalize cannabis for non-medicinal use. The move from criminalization to regulation in many ways aligned the sale and use of cannabis with that of alcohol. This brought a renewed focus on the issue of impaired driving. Across the nation, impaired driving is the leading cause of criminal injury and death, and drug impaired driving is a growing trend.

Police agencies are working to keep the roads safe and apprehend impaired drivers. This talk will describe the methods the police are using to detect drug impaired drivers at the roadside. We’ll discuss the well-established psychophysical coordination tests and the newly adopted oral fluid test and why some police agencies utilize this technology, while others have rejected it.

// Location: Okanagan Room //
// Location: Shuswap/Pennask/Skeena Room //
Learning Objectives
• Identify what Alcoholics Anonymous does and does not do
• Know the resources available to clients/patients through Alcoholics Anonymous
• Communicate hope to clients/patients who are still struggling with the disease of alcoholism

// Location: Okanagan Room //
This session is on psychotherapeutic strategies adapted for office practice. It is designed for short office appointments. It will allow participants to use some aspects of motivational interviewing to help patients reach a decision on change behaviour specifically adapted to addiction medicine. If a patient is not ready to change despite destructive behaviour, CBT mythology can be used to start a change of the patient to facilitate safe lifestyle.

Learning Objectives
• Acquiring tools to assist patients in resolving their ambivalence about changing their self destructive behaviour

// Location: Okanagan Room //
// Location: Shuswap/Pennask/Skeena Room //
Lives, families and communities have been devastated in the wake of North America’s opioid crisis. While there are many up-stream factors that led to this situation, the presence of illicit fentanyl in a drug supply once dominated by heroin and prescription opioids, has led to an unprecedented loss of life.

In examining the current state of the crisis, questions arise. Are people trying to avoid fentanyl or seek it out? Fentanyl is reportedly lethal in minute quantities, so what’s the typical dose found on the street? Has heroin completely disappeared? While people are dying, who’s profiting? This talk will address these questions and will examine the policies and street level practices helping to stop lethal overdoses.

// Location: Okanagan Room //

Learning Objectives
• Participants will understand the history of clinical psychedelic research, and why it was abandoned in the early 1970
• Participants will be familiar with the range of current clinical scientific investigations into psychedelic treatments for mental and substance use disorder
• Participants will be familiar with some of the explanatory mechanisms (neuroscientific, psychological, spiritual) hypothesized to account for the potential therapeutic effectiveness of psychedelic treatments for addictions

// Location: Okanagan Room //

Learning Objectives
• Describe several approaches to defining and measuring cravings
• Appraise current state of research in cravings
• Cite several evidence-based strategies for cravings prevention and management
• Review the central features of craving neurobiology

// Location: Okanagan Room //
Open to delegates

// Location: Shuswap/Pennask/Skeena Room //

Saturday, May 4, 2019

Stop by the WCAF registration desk to register or check in for the event!

// Location: Okanagan Foyer //
// Location: Shuswap/Pennask/Skeena Room //
Open to all

// Location: Summit Room //

Learning Objectives
• To provide an overview of lesser-known opioids
• To review what is known about their pharmacology
• To discuss substance-specific considerations related to diagnosis and treatment

// Location: Okanagan Room //
The importance of human beings connecting with each other is essential in the process of an individual finding hope and motivation to make changes in their life. Having connection may not initiate change right away but over time it shows an individual that they are cared for and they are valuable and creates self-esteem within the shame and guilt that addiction creates.



Learning Objectives
• Human connection changes direction - how compassion can change someone's life
• Harm reduction saves lives and what harm reduction looks like
• Do you view addiction with compassion or conviction and what can you change in your views?
• Removing the stigma of harm reduction and addiction

// Location: Okanagan Room //
// Location: Shuswap/Pennask/Skeena Room //

Dr. Annabel Mead // New Products for OAT
Learning Objectives
• Review the applicability, benefits and limitations of current medications approved for Opioid Agonist Therapy (OAT) in Canada
• Describe the new and emerging pharmacotherapies for OAT and their potential role in improving OUD treatment outcomes
• Identify clinical scenarios where new therapies may have the greatest impact on engaging and retaining patients in care

Dr. Monty Ghosh // Buprenorphine Induction Strategies
Learning Objectives
• Examine the literature on transitioning individuals from other opioids to buprenorphine/naloxone SL
• Understand how to transition patients off high dose methadone to SL buprenorphine
• Understand how to use the BuTrans patch delivery system to “bridge” and effectively transition patients onto SL buprenorphine
• Examine Micro-induction
• Learn about the fentanyl patch delivery system “bridging” method
• Explore the Calgary SROM transition strategy

Dr. Rob Tanguay // Deprescribing Opioids - How, Why and When?
Learning Objectives
• Develop and understanding of the bio-psycho-social concept of pain
• Utilize appropriate screening tools for pain and identifying comorbid mental health
• Develop a skill set in opioid deprescribing

// Location: Okanagan Room //
// Location: Shuswap/Pennask/Skeena Room //

Learning Objectives
• Describe several trends in addiction prevention and treatment, and describe potential future trajectories
• Appraise sociopolitical forces that may serve to shape future approaches to addiction management
• Estimate/predict the role of “big data” in defining future approaches to addiction management
• Forecast potential technological innovations and their impact on addictions, including, for example, the Internet of Things
• Review the central features of healthcare innovation and propose how these might manifest in the future of addiction prevention and treatment

// Location: Okanagan Room //

Learning Objectives
• Gain an understanding of how the province's linked administrative databases can be used to monitor health system performance pertaining to opioid use disorders
• Learn of regional disparities in the number and characteristics of people with opioid use disorder across the province
• Learn of disparities in health system performance across four domains: care engagement, compliance to OAT guidelines, healthcare integration and healthcare utilization
• Understand the role of OAT in protecting against mortality in PWOUD

// Location: Okanagan Room //

Many of the mat yoga poses have been adapted for the chair, offering gentle stretching to ease muscle tension due to long sitting at meetings, conferences or sitting in front of a computer. This session includes introduction to breath work, stretching, gentle spinal twists, hip openers, shoulder rolls, lower back release.

// Location: Okanagan Room //

Learning Objectives
• Understanding the legal necessity of boundaries
• Designing boundary protocols to ensure legal compliance
• Handling boundary violations

// Location: Okanagan Room //
// Location: Shuswap/Pennask/Skeena Room //

Learning Objectives
• Recognize the signs of trauma history and heightened responses in perinatal period
• Integrate the 4 principles of trauma informed care into clinical work
• Increased knowledge in the powerful interplay of pregnancy on substance use and substance use on pregnancy
• Recognize opportunity for empowerment and advocacy for families

// Location: Okanagan Room //
Enjoy a night with your friends & colleagues overlooking the Okanagan Lake.
*Must have ticket to attend

// Location: Upper Terrace //

Sunday, May 5, 2019

Stop by the WCAF registration desk to register or check in for the event!

// Location: Okanagan Foyer //
// Location: Shuswap/Pennask/Skeena Room //
Open to all

// Location: Summit Room //

Learning Objectives
• To review nonmedical use of prescription drugs other than opioids
• To understand the pharmacology of these drugs
• To discuss substance-specific considerations related to diagnosis and treatment

// Location: Okanagan Room //
This session will provide a pharmacy perspective on some common issues encountered when dispensing prescriptions for opioid agonist treatment (OAT) and provide some practical advice on enhancing pharmacist-prescriber communication.




Learning Objectives
• Understand common challenges encountered when dispensing OAT in BC
• Recognize legal prescription requirements when prescribing OAT in BC
• Appreciate relevant pharmacist scope of practice issues in regards to dispensing OAT prescriptions
• Apply some practical solutions to improving pharmacist-prescriber communications for patients on OAT

// Location: Okanagan Room //

// Location: Okanagan Room //
// Location: Shuswap/Pennask/Skeena Room //
Most physicians and clinicians are unaware inexpensive pharmacotherapies exist that can dramatically improve the chance of success when treating people suffering with Alcohol Use Disorder. This talk introduces the subject and explores the issues and the opportunities to provide this new standard of care.



Learning Objectives
• Understand there is a new standard of care for people with Alcohol Use Disorder
• Understand how this new standard of care has developed and the barriers that have impaired it’s adoption
• Understand that pharmacotherapies are part of the new standard of care and how to decide when and how to use which medication

// Location: Okanagan Room //
Cannabis remains the most illicit drug used in the world today with an estimated 180 million people using marijuana regularly and its use is associated with significant adverse social and health consequences including the onset of psychosis and increased risk for suicidality among teens and young adults. The potency of cannabis (content of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, THC) has increased three-fold to four-fold, and the ways in which users consume cannabis have changed, raising the concerns regarding the increasing potency of cannabis and the ensuing harmful effects– including addiction, accidents, learning and mental disorders, impaired brain development, under achievement and concurrent smoking of marijuana and tobacco with premature death. There is an ongoing debate that cannabis can treat opiate and other drug addictions. The legal landscape regarding legalization or decriminalization of recreational cannabis or legalization of cannabis or its products-THC and cannabidiol (CBD) as medicine has evolved rapidly and continues to remain a major topic for debates and discussions all over the world. Thus, the role of psychiatrists/addiction medicine physicians, primary care physicians and pharmacists in understanding the effect of new marijuana laws has become important because of the potential effect of cannabis on mental and physical health. Data from recent surveys of physicians demonstrate a distribution and range of viewpoints relevant to and important for the practicing addiction physician regarding cannabis. Majority of physicians felt that smoking cannabis is harmful, addictive and serves as gateway drug to other addictive substances and that adolescents, pregnant women, and those with mental disorders are highly vulnerable to the adverse health effects of smoking cannabis; and would not consider prescribing crude cannabis or unapproved cannabinoids as medicine for the treatment of either insomnia, traumatic stress, pain, or opiate or other drug addiction. This presentation will discuss the current laws and regulations governing the recreational and medical cannabis enacted by states, provinces and countries and the guidelines for physicians, pharmacists and others, who serve on the frontlines dealing with patients asking for cannabis or cannabis products for medicinal purposes; and the role physicians could play in dealing with their patients.

Learning Objectives
• The current laws governing the recreational and medicinal use of cannabis in states, provinces and countries in the world
• The current practice guidelines for physicians and other health care providers that deal with patients asking for medicinal cannabis or its products for medicinal purposes
• The role physicians and other healthcare providers must play in dealing with their patients asking for medicinal cannabis

// Location: Okanagan Room //

Evening Programs

Dr. Peter Rothfels & Dr. Launette Rieb

WorkSafeBC is hosting accredited events throughout B.C.

The learning objectives of this session are designed to help you:
• Incorporate the College’s Standards for the safe prescribing of opioids into clinical practice
• Apply key principles for tapering of opioids and initiating substitution and exit strategies
• List risks and benefits of non-opioid treatment modalities for chronic non-cancer pain and gain confidence in recommending them
• Identify community and regional resources and supports, including WorkSafeBC programs
• Develop confidence in engaging patients in the difficult conversations related to tapering opioids, exiting opioids, and/or refusing to prescribe opioids
• Screen and identify coexisting substance use disorder, mood disorder, and sleep disturbances

// Location: Mount Boucherie Room //
Overall Learning Objectives
• Describe novel pharmacological options in the clinical management of opioid use disorder
• Assess the best use of pharmacological and non-pharmacological tools in managing opioid use disorder in patients with psychiatric and medical co-morbidities
• Understand how to administer new opioid use disorder treatment options safely and effectively

Dr. Leslie Lappaleinen // Introduction: Here and now: OUD in Western Canada / update to BCCSU guidelines
Learning Objectives
• Address the challenges and barriers in treating OUD in Western Canada, and highlight the urgent need to “catalyze change”

Dr. Joel Bordman // medTalk: New strategies for the treatment of OUD in Canada
Learning Objectives
• Describe the latest treatment options in the management of OUD

Dr. Michael Frostmed // medTalk: Clinical experience with new OUD treatments
Learning Objectives
• Discuss practical experience with new OUD treatments
• Explain how to better manage clinically challenging populations (e.g., chaotic patients, patients with comorbidities) through individualized intervention

Ms. Sheri Denham // medTalk: The nurses’ role in providing medication for the treatment of OUD
Learning Objectives
• Discuss patient education about OUD medications, and its role in supporting adherence and retention • Compare the efficacy and safety of available treatments for OUD and use this information to inform clinical management of patients

// Location: Okanagan Room //
* program is subject to change